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Throughout human history most people lived their lives on farms.  In the last 100 years, we’ve lived in cities.  Now it would seem we live our lives online.    

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Our best days in the flying business are when the weather is clear, the winds are behind us, and the airplane is humming along, skimming the tops of the clouds like a Pegasus.  Add in a plane load of interesting people headed out to one or more of the places interesting people tend to go, and the experience becomes downright sublime. We get to experience a lot of days like this thanks to a long and growing list of customers like you.  

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These days I hear a lot of talk about America and how great it is…or isn’t.  If one goes searching for the bad stuff it can always be found but the varied views on greatness will generally reflect the wide array of experiences and lifestyles our country offers and will be influenced by one’s understanding of why and how this country came into being.

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At this very moment armies of 20-somethings employed by technology companies around the world are busy thinking up ways to change the way we buy, sell, work, play, communicate, recreate, and travel.  Their goal is to create computer software that will make the buying of products and services faster, easier, and more efficient and, in time, make their new technologies an indispensable part of our lives.    

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Without a doubt, flying aboard the Concorde supersonic transport was the coolest airplane ride of my life.  The departure from Paris was better described as a launch than a takeoff--barreling down the runway, engines screaming, the eventual leap skyward coming at the very last moment.  Peering out the tiny cabin window I could see moisture swirling past the wing of this needle-nosed speedster as it struggled to fly smoothly in the low-speed phase of its 3½ hour sprint to New York. 

Before we knew it, we passed the French coastline and powered up for the cruise-climb into the upper stratosphere where Concorde could stretch her legs, steadily gaining speed and altitude until the cabin machmeter clicked over 2.0, letting everyone know we had reached twice the speed of sound.

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